Jordyn Wickard, the Indiana Angus Junior Princess, like many other Angus royalty, had a busy week of contests and shows. Wickard showed this animal, competed in the Certified Angus Beef cook-off, as well as in the speaking contests and quiz bowl.
Jordyn Wickard, the Indiana Angus Junior Princess, like many other Angus royalty, had a busy week of contests and shows. Wickard showed this animal, competed in the Certified Angus Beef cook-off, as well as in the speaking contests and quiz bowl.
INDIANAPOLIS — The Angus Royalty program gives participants the opportunity to promote the Angus breed, beef consumption and the beef industry.

Giving the royalty the skills needed to become ambassadors for the breed and learn the leadership skills needed in life is something the American Angus Association tries to do, said Bryce Schumann, CEO of the association.

The Indiana Angus Royalty contest, sponsored by the Indiana Angus Auxiliary, requires those who become the Indiana Angus queen, princess and junior princess to attend functions highlighting the breed, including the National Junior Angus Show that recently took place in Indianapolis.

Indiana Angus Junior Princess Jordyn Wickard was active in this year’s show. Wickard attended the queen’s luncheon kicking off the weeklong event where she gave the invocation.

She also competed in contests, including the cattle show, Certified Angus Beef Cook-off, public speaking contests and quiz bowl.

Also advocating for the breed and industry were Miss Indiana Angus Brooke Langley and Indiana Angus Princess Jessica Janssen.

Langley, the daughter of Craig and Sherry Langley, had a busy week, showing her cattle, competing and handing out ribbons at events.

Showing cattle has been a family event for most of Langley’s life. Three generations in the family have shown cattle, and in 2006 her sister, Jenna, also was queen. 

In a speech to become queen, Langley spoke of her memories of when her sister was the Angus queen the last time the national show was in Indianapolis. 

“You may remember me being the little pig-tailed girl riding around in a little red wagon with my tiny boots hanging over the sides, but now I want to be the girl wearing the crown promoting our amazing breed,” she said. 

Langley, a senior at Lewis Cass Jr.-Sr. High School in Walton, previously was an Indiana Angus princess and knew she wanted to become queen and be an ambassador for the breed. 

“Angus is by far the best breed, and I wanted to do my part in telling people that,” she said. 

Other states had Angus royalty in attendance, including Miss American Angus Catherine Harward. Harward, who is from North Carolina, became Miss American Angus last November.

Her year can be described as hectic, but great, she said.

“I got to travel across the country and meet people I wouldn’t have been able to meet any other way,” Harward said. “I’ve learned a lot about being an ambassador for the beef industry.”

“When I was younger, I never imagined I could be Miss American Angus,” she said. “It has really opened my mind to what being an ambassador means.”

Harward, the daughter of Marcus and Patty Harward, grew up on a beef farm and always has been interested in agriculture. She has carried that passion on with her to college, where she is studying animal science and agribusiness at North Carolina State.

Although she is unsure of what she will do when she graduates, she is sure she wants to continue with advocacy, a passion becoming Miss American Angus has helped her realize.

There will be a new selection of girls chosen as Angus royalty this winter. Although their time serving in these roles will come to an end in the coming months, their advocacy for the beef industry and Angus breed will not.