Investors, all of whom are also farmers, gathered to break ground in a field that will host a fertilizer plant. The plant will provide fertilizer to local and regional farmers.
Investors, all of whom are also farmers, gathered to break ground in a field that will host a fertilizer plant. The plant will provide fertilizer to local and regional farmers.
LOGANSPORT, Ind. — Investors and community leaders met Sept. 17 to break ground in a field that soon will be a fertilizer facility.

The facility will be a unique farmer-owned venture that will supply fertilizer to north-central Indiana, east-central Illinois and west-central Ohio.

“I’m not aware of another project like this going on in the U.S.,” said Jim Hedrick, president of Sagamore Ag Source. “It is all farmer investors. It is 100-percent farmer owned, farmer controlled and independently operated.”

It will produce a new source of fertilizer, Hedrick said.

The project started two years ago when a group of farmers saw a need for and an opportunity to create a new business model. They wanted to build a plant that would source and provide fertilizer for the eastern Corn Belt.

After market and industry research, plans were made to start the business.

“Currently where we are with the project is we just completed soil borings a couple weeks ago,” Hedrick said. “We cleared the site. We have the building tentatively laid out. We hope to have the final engineering in about a week or 10 days.”

They hope to start construction within 30 days. The building is expected to be completed by Dec.1 of this year.

“It will receive, store and distribute liquid and dry fertilizer,” Hedrick said. “We’ll be storing urea, potash and diammonium phosphate, all three very stable, nonflammable products.”

The products will be sourced from local and global suppliers. Hedrick said that the potash could come from Canada, the phosphate probably will come from Florida and the urea could come from as far away as the Middle East.

When the facility reaches full capacity, there will be 1,600 to 2,000 trucks passing through a year, which will help the local economy, he said. Most of the trucks will be farmer owned or from local trucking companies.

There also will be several full-time and part-time employees.

“I think it’s going to be wonderful,” said Chris Armstrong, community development director for the City of Logansport. “It will bring jobs and help with economic growth. We need all of that. We need as much of that as we can get.”

Rob Davis, a soybean and wheat farmer in Ambia, decided to become an investor in the project this summer.

“It looked like a good investment opportunity,” he said. “The main reason was the ability to buy our products at a cheaper rate.”