Kelly Kravig talks about the new features of the Case IH 4400 series corn head during a media event. This 12-row corn head folds to allow farmers to move from field to field without the need to remove the head from the combine for transport. This head features patented corn saver louvers, which are designed to funnel the ear to the ear channel, resulting in improved grain savings.
Kelly Kravig talks about the new features of the Case IH 4400 series corn head during a media event. This 12-row corn head folds to allow farmers to move from field to field without the need to remove the head from the combine for transport. This head features patented corn saver louvers, which are designed to funnel the ear to the ear channel, resulting in improved grain savings.

DENVER — Farmers will be moving from field to field quicker with the new Case IH corn and draper headers.

“This past year, Case IH has invested over $60 million in the Burlington, Iowa facility,” said Nate Weinkauf, Case IH marketing manager for combines, during a Case IH media event.

“This plant has some history. In 1937, the Case company purchased this facility and built Case combines, and then in the ’50s it became a tractor, loader and backhoe facility,” he said. “Now we are producing harvesting equipment there again.”

The new Combine Header Center of Excellence facility is producing the new 4400 series corn heads and 3100 series draper heads.

“This state-of-the-art facility is designed to meet our customer demands,” Weinkauf said.

“We have to build a head that meets the demands,” he said. “We’ve got to be able to harvest 300-bushel corn — not at 2 to 3 mph, but we’re looking to go to 5 to 6 mph. That’s what this new corn head will do — harvest more per day.”

“The process to develop new equipment is pretty simple process — we listen to the customer to find out what they want, so we can make them more productive and efficient,” said Kelly Kravig, Case IH combines and headers marketing manager.

The 4400 series corn heads are available in six-, eight- and 12-row versions with 30-, 36- or 38-inch spacing. Producers also have the option to select a chopping or non-chopping corn head.

“The new 12-row folding corn head makes transporting heads easier,” Kravig said. “The snouts are designed at the pivoting point to move the hoods up so there is clearance to fold them.”

Six rows of the head remain in the same position, and six rows are folded up. The folding procedure is completed from the cab of the combine.

The chopping head features rotary blades underneath.

“The cornstalks are fed into the paths of the blades to size and manage the stalk,” the marketing manager explained. “The blades cut them to a consistent 4- to 6-inch stalk, which allows producers to manage the residue better.”

Producers can engage and disengage the chopping mechanisms by pulling a lever.

“This allows producers the flexibility to choose how they manage their fields and the residue,” Kravig said.

Case IH has focused on saving grain during the harvesting process since this is so important to farmers.

“Seed companies are genetically engineering corn to dry down quicker, and the husks actually start to peal back and expose the corn,” the Case IH spokesman said. “The challenge with that exposed corn is its vulnerability to kernel loss.”

To save more grain, the new corn heads feature patented corn saver louvers.

“The louvers are designed to funnel the ear to the ear channel,” Kravig said. “There is a 2 percent improvement in corn loss with the corn saver louvers over a traditional rounded hood design.”

The 3100 series draper heads range from 25 to 45 feet.

“The 3152 is typically used in wheat, barley and canola crops, and the 3162 flex draper is designed for soybeans,” the marketing specialist reported. “All the draper heads feature a new patented CentraCut knife design.”

As the draper head moves through the field, the crop is cut and lies down on the draper belt.

“The crop is fed head first to the feeder house, which is a very efficient way of feeding the combine,” Kravig said. “This allows increased field speeds by one-half mph to 1.5 mph.”

In addition, Kravig said an advantage of this draper head is less susceptibility to changes in crop moisture.

“We can start earlier in the morning and we can run later at night, which means farmers end up harvesting more acres per day,” he added.

The flexible cutterbar will flex 3 inches up and 3 inches down.

“When you have rolling terrain, this header will flex down to harvest the beans and save more grain,” the marketing manager said. “And it handles rocky field conditions.”

An indicator shows the operator how much the cutterbar is flexing.

“The flex draper allows us to follow the ground terrain better,” Kravig said.

“Our new exclusive feature is the low-speed transport package on the draper head that can be deployed from inside the cab,” he said.

“To deploy the transport package, the operator lifts the head completely up and the wheels hydraulically unfold and move under the head,” the marketing manager said. “Then he attaches the tongue to the head and can either pull the head with the combine or another vehicle.”

This transport package eliminates the need for a header cart, and the head can be towed up to 25 mph.

“It takes about 10 minutes to unhook the head and be ready for transport,” Weinkauf said.

“That’s the kind of innovation our customers are looking for to make their lives easier,” Kravig added.