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  •  Darren Frye
    It’s summer, and if you have a grain operation, you’re keeping a close eye on the weather forecast. At times, the weekly forecast seems to change almost every day. Wouldn’t it be frustrating if your production plans changed as often as the weather forecast does? 
  • Jared Finegan
    This has had to be the most comfortable summer weather we have had in my adult life. Hope everyone has enjoyed all the fun summer activities this year. This cool weather has not been the best for the crops, however. 
  • Ted Mottaz
    The growing season continues to amaze me and my fellow area farmers. Just as we were starting to get a little dry with yards showing some stress, we got about 2 inches of rain for the week. The corn potential is fairly well set. 
  • Grant Noland
    Should a large corn and soybean crop materialize, producers and commercial facilities will face challenges in harvest logistics. As a former elevator manager, a record — potentially wet — corn crop will keep you up at night. 
  • David Droste
    Beans will need to be watched closely for leaf disease since the rain and the foggy mornings that we have been having can cause disease to develop and justify fungicide applications. 
  • Darren Frye
    Are you proud of your family farming operation? Are you confident and excited about how your farm has developed — and where you’re headed in the future? Successful operations should be proud of what they have accomplished. 
  • Jared Finegan
    If we could have controlled the weather for the Iroquois County Fair, we wouldn’t have made it as perfect as it was. I cannot remember a year where it didn’t rain at all, and I don’t think it has ever been as comfortably cool as it was this year. 
  • Ted Mottaz
    Week 12 of our growing season observations is basically more of the same. Corn and soybeans are still progressing very well. As I stated last week, I spent the past week in Washington, D.C., and I basically got this week’s update from one of my neighbors. 
  • Grant Noland
    For the first time in six weeks, I’m providing an update without measurable rainfall for our area. Even without rain, the cooler-than-average temperatures have allowed for adequate subsoil moisture to remain present beneath the canopy, and crop conditions are very good. 
  • David Droste
    This past week saw cooler-than-normal temps, which were enjoyed by everyone. The corn crop especially benefited while most of it was finishing its pollination period. 
 



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